Menu Pricing: Why Restaurants Lose Money on Popular Dishes

We often presume to understand restaurant economics because we know what a chicken breast costs at the supermarket. “I could make this dish at home for $5,” goes the refrain. Could we? Here, Eater looks at all the costs in a popular restaurant dish to see what goes into it, and how much profit comes out.


Like many restaurants, New York’s Dirt Candy was a different business before the pandemic. With a staff of 35, it served only a tasting menu (plus a half-dozen a la carte items available at the bar), guests leisurely eating courses of fennel tagine, seaweed

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Learn to cook delicious dishes from anywhere with these online classes

Cooking can be fun at any age, and learning new skills exercises your mind, especially as you get older. Whether you’re just finding your way around the kitchen or you’re a seasoned home chef, online cooking classes can be a wonderful way to spend your day. From free courses featuring various dishes to lessons led by celebrity chefs, there are vast opportunities to satisfy just about any culinary curiosity.

Plus, one great thing about taking a virtual cooking class is you can learn to whip up meals from the comfort of your kitchen. That way, there’s no pressure to deliver

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German cuisine: food culture, traditions, and popular dishes

From Lapskaus in the north to Maultaschen in the south, we explain all you need to know about German cuisine and food traditions.

While German cuisine might be associated with two things – potatoes and sauerkraut – there is actually much more to it than meets the eye. In fact, German cuisine is incredibly diverse and draws on inspiration from Polish, Turkish, and Jewish cooking traditions, among others. It is also heavily regional in nature, with each state (Bundesland) featuring its own favorite dishes. From Lapskaus in the north to Maultaschen in the south, it’s surprising just how

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Tommy Centola: Two popular dishes from a unique restaurant | Community

In a city full of unique restaurants, Arnaud’s, in the French Quarter, certainly falls into that category.

Opened in 1918 by a wine salesman named Arnaud Cazenave, Arnaud’s has become the largest freestanding restaurant in New Orleans. Considering its location in the French Quarter, that is no small feat. Count Arnaud, as he was known, kept reinvesting in his restaurant by buying up buildings around his.

Another reason Arnaud’s is unique is the Mardi Gras museum located on the property. The count’s daughter, Germaine Cazenave Wells, is said to have been queen of more than 22 carnival balls from 1937-68.

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Fare from afar: Chef shares authentic ingredients, dishes of Portuguese cuisine to transport your taste buds

What better way to explore a culture than through its cuisine?

After missing out on eating our way through new cities over the last year, “Good Morning America” Food decided to chat up chefs from around the globe to bring us into their kitchen and share a taste of their fare from afar.

Use this as your guide to explore a new culture and cuisine in three ways: In your own kitchen with the chef’s advice below; eating at a local restaurant in your neighborhood or city that specializes in these foods; and as a conversation starter once you

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Easter dishes from around the world |

(CNN) — Honey-glazed ham, garlic mashed potatoes and fluffy dinner rolls might be staples at American Easter meals, but around the world, there are many distinct ways to savor the holiday — ones that incorporate both local ingredients and unique cultural traditions.

“Italians go all out,” said Judy Witts Francini, creator of the Italian food blog Divina Cucina. She’s from California but has lived in Florence and Tuscany for decades.

Witts Francini’s Easter lunch starts with an assortment of antipasti. For the first course, she serves a savory tart called torta pasqualina, which has 33 layers of phyllo

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